1940s

1940s
Annie Wyatt inspires the founding of Australia's first National Trust, to protect built and natural heritage.The early colonial buildings in Sydney's Macquarie Street, including The Mint, Hyde Park Barracks and Parliament House are saved from demolition.

Significant heritage is listed - a precursor to the development of the National Trust Register.

1950s

1950s
The Trust acquires Montague Island in 1953 - the start of an ongoing commitment to protect wetlands and coastal lands. Action is taken to protect historic Norflolk Island buildings.

Sir Henry Parkes Memorial School of Arts (formerly Tenterfield School of Arts) is acquired by the Trust in 1957 by an Act of Parliament.

1960s

1960s
Inauguration of National Trust Restoration Appeals, starting with St Mary’s and St Andrew’s Cathedrals in Sydney, St Matthew’s Church at Windsor and Gundagai Bridge. The Trust acquires Experiment Farm Cottage (c1835), Harris Park; Ludovic Blackwood Memorial Sanctuary; Everglades House and Gardens (1930s), Leura; Lindesay (1834), Darling Point; Stella James House (1934), Avalon; Old Government House (from 1799), Parramatta, and Governor Macquarie’s Tomb, Isle of Mull, Scotland.

The Trust becomes a statutory body under the National Trust of Australia (NSW) Act 1960.

1970s

1970s
Campaigns protect town and country alike from development rampages. The Trust and Builders & Labourers Federation (now CFMEU) join forces to save The Rocks, Victoria Street (Kings Cross) and much of Glebe from destruction. Queen Victoria Building, Sydney, is saved from demolition.

The Trust acquires Cooma Cottage (c1834), Yass, home of Hamilton Hume; Norman Lindsay Gallery and some artworks, Springwood; the National Trust Centre on Observatory Hill and opens the S.H. Ervin Gallery (1856), Observatory Hill; Grossmann House (1871), Maitland; Riversdale (c1840), Goulburn; Harpers Mansion (1834), Berrima; Miss Traill’s House and Garden (1834), Bathurst and Woodford Academy (1840s), Woodford. The National Trust centre is dated 1815.

1980s

1980s
Major campaigns to save rainforests from logging. Industrial heritage gains recognition. Campaigns to protect fragile rural heritage. The start of long campaigns to save contemporary icons including the Capitol Theatre, and the Woolloomooloo Finger Wharf.

The Trust acquires Vienna Cottage (1871), Hunters Hill; Saumarez Homestead (1888-1896), Armidale; Dundullimal Homestead (c1842), Dubbo, and Tomago House (1840s), Tomago.

1990s

1990s
Protection of Newcastle’s heritage following a major earthquake. Protection of fragile ecosystems from practices such as peat and sand mining. The start of a long campaign to protect picture palaces throughout the state. Lobbying commences to help stop the sale of defence sites around Sydney Harbour.

The Trust acquires Tomago Chapel, Tomago House – gifted in 1995 by the Uniting Church. The Trust resolves to add no more properties to its portfolio which are not given without adequate funding for their future care.

2000 and beyond

2000 and beyond
Centenary of Federation funding from the Federal Government enables the Trust to carry out major conservation works at ten key properties by 2001. Federal funding under the 2010 Jobs Fund programme funds major works at four key properties.

The Trust leads campaigns to protect Sydney as a Working Harbour, protect the Catherine Hill Bay coastal environment from major over-development and save the railway heritage of Eveleigh Rail Workshops.

The Trust opposes planning legislation which overrides the protection of the NSW Heritage Act and, in 2010, develops Alternative Concepts to protect and celebrate the rich heritage of Sydney’s Barangaroo site.